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Ingredients

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Ingredient . Almond oil  

About Ingredient

Since our childhood, we have heard from our parents and grandparents that almond oil is really good for our health as well as beauty. However, how many of us actually know how the oil proves to be beneficial to us. Very few, right! As the name suggests, almond oil is extracted from the dry fruit called almond, which we usually consume in desserts and chocolates. Along with a nutty taste, the oil has a slight odour and can also be substituted for olive oil. It is characteristically clear in colour, with a shade of yellow. Sweet almond oil, which is acquired from the dried kernel of a plant, used to be utilized by the massage therapists earlier, for lubricating the skin during a massage session. This is because it is an effective emollient too. After knowing about almond oil, let us explore its positive effects on our body and beauty. Scroll down to know about the benefits of almond oil.

History

 

Highly nutritious almonds and almond oil (pressed from them) were immensely popular in Greece and Italy long before the Christian era. It was during the Middle Ages, when almonds became an important commerce good in Central Europe. The ancient texts and studies reveal numerous wonderful virtues of the almond. It was chiefly valued for its application in preventing intoxication.

Being a native of the warmer parts of Western Asia and North Africa, the Almond tree cultivation is extensively distributed over the warm temperate regions of the Old World. It is cultivated in all the countries bordering on the Mediterranean.

Benefits


Almond oil is packed with unsaturated fats (mostly monounsaturated fats) and vitamin E; powerful nutrients that greatly benefit skin health. Fats are needed for healthy cell membranes and vitamin E is a strong antioxidant that protects cells from free radical damage. Almond oil can help skin problems when taken internally or used externally.

Almond oil is not as greasy as most oils and, when applied topically, it does not clog up pores. It works well with all types of skin but is especially helpful for dry and irritated skin. It helps hold in moisture, keeping the skin looking young and healthy. It can help reduce fine wrinkles and erase dark circles under the eyes. It can also help relieve itching and soothe inflammation. Almond oil contain B vitamins, Vitamin D and Vitamin E also.

Nutritional profile

Almond and almond oil is used extensively in ancient medical techniques like Ayurveda and Unani medicines. Despite being a seed, it boasts of being counted in the premium health food category consisting whole foods such as other nuts. Presence of high amounts nutrients produces energy. Almond oil is incredibly rich in minerals like Manganese, Magnesium, Copper, Phosphorus, Iron, Zinc and Potassium. However, Selenium is also present in good amount. Almond nuts are a powerhouse of Vitamin E, Riboflavin, Thiamine, Niacin and Folate. Good amounts of Vitamin B6 and Pantothenic Acid are also present all this makes almond oil an excellent ingredient for other products.

Disclaimer

The information provided in this fact sheet is for educational purposes only and must not be taken or interpreted as a suggestion or as medical advise. If you have any medical conditions you should consult your health care professional.

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Ingredient . Aloe Vera

About Ingredient

The aloe plant is subtropical and requires a great deal of water. Most of this water is stored in a gel-like substance, referred to as "aloe gel," within the leaves. This gel carries the numerous water-soluble nutrients and other components throughout the plant. Think of it as the blood of the human body carrying nutrients throughout. Aloe Vera is a rich source of naturally-occurring nutritional substances. These components include twenty amino acids, eight enzymes, nine minerals, plant sterols, monosaccharides and polysaccharides, antioxidants, vitamins A, C, E, B complex, glycoproteins and other substances. Aloe Vera is a virtual gold mine of health-supporting phytonutrients. Some have described the interaction of these components as similar to the synergistic workings of the instruments in an orchestra, working together for grand results.

History

Aloe vera, which has been used since recorded history began. For its health-supporting properties, literally tons of aloe gel have been consumed by citizens of just about every country in the world. Aloe's popularity today, 25 years ago, or even 4000 years ago, is proof of the plants benefits to its users. The Aloe family includes over two hundred closely related plant species. Aloe Vera has been used extensively for more than four thousand years and has sparked much interest more recently within the scientific community. The plant has leaves which can grow up to four feet in length and weigh up to five pounds each.

Benefits

Aloe Vera has long been used in many areas of health both internally and externally. Aloe has been widely used in many products, skin, hair, drinks, cosmetics and helps support energy and overall activity levels and acts as a general tonic. Most recently, scientists are beginning to understand that Aloe Vera supports healthy body collagen as well. Aloe vera has become of widespread interest to athletes, sports participants and other highly active people interested in maintaining their activity levels.

Nutritional profile

There is no single ingredient responsible for Aloe Vera's amazing health benefits. It is believed that fifteen different compound groups of nutrients achieve this result through a synergistic effect (each ingredient taken together works far better than any single element taken by itself - like all the trace elements and minerals that make up good soil). The main elements responsible for Aloes health benefits, however, are believed to be Polysaccharides, Photonutrients, Monosaccharides, Vitamins, Minerals and Amino Acids. In fact, Aloe contains over 200 active ingredients of which the most prominent are: Vitamins A, C, E, B, B12, Choline, Folic Acid & Amino Acids. Aloe contains 7 of the 8 essential amino acids. Provides 20 of 22 amino acids required by humans. Minerals - Aloe provides 9 essential minerals such as Calcium, Copper, Chromium, Magnesium, Iron, Potassium, Zinc, Sodium, Manganese. Phytonutrients - Natural plant growth hormones, sterols and salicyates. Enzymes - Provides 8 important enzymes. Sugars - Monosaccharides and Polysaccharides (long chain sugar molecules that are essential to the quality and efficacy of Aloe Vera.

Disclaimer

The information provided in this fact sheet is for educational purposes only and must not be taken or interpreted as a suggestion or as medical advise. If you have any medical conditions you should consult your health care professional.

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Ingredient . Apple Cider Vinegar

About Ingredient

The Real Apple Cider Vinegar

The apple cider vinegar that contains all of the health benefits is not a clear vinegar, but just the opposite. It is an organic and unfiltered vinegar . It is not a clear liquid, but has got a brownish tinge to it. If you try looking through it, you will notice a tiny cobweb-like substance floating in it. This is known as "mother", and means just one thing. This apple cider vinegar is of good quality with all the nutrients and health giving properties intact.

History

Health benefits

There surely must be something really healthy in using apple cider vinegar, since The Father of Medicine, Hippocrates, used this vinegar around 400 B.C. for its health giving qualities. It is said that he had only two remedies: honey and apple cider vinegar.

Benefits

What are the Benefits of Apple Cider Vinegar?
Natural Apple Cider Vinegar is a wonderful natural cure for a number of ailments which usually require antibiotics and other medications that have a number of side effects. In particular, Apple Cider Vinegar has been known to:

· Reduce sinus infections and sore throats

· Balance high cholesterol

· Cure skin conditions such as acne

· Protect against food poisoning

· Fight allergies in both humans and animals

· Prevent muscle fatigue after exercise

· Strengthen the immune system

· Increase stamina

· Increase metabolism which promotes weight loss

· Improve digestion and cure constipation

· Alleviate symptoms of arthritis and gout

· Prevents bladder stones and urinary tract infections

· Weight Loss

Nutritional profile

Apple cider vinegar is rich in potassium and also contains boron, iron, minerals, trace minerals, enzymes and pectin.

Warnings and Side Affects

Continued use of pure apple cider vinegar or any acidic food can weaken the enamel on teeth, apple cider vinegar should be diluted in water of 5 mil ACV to glass of water.

Disclaimer

The information provided in this fact sheet is for educational purposes only and must not be taken or interpreted as a suggestion or as medical advise. If you have any medical conditions you should consult your health care professional.

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Ingredient . Apricot kernel oil

About Ingredient

The apricot, known formally as Prunus armeniaca, is a small yellow to orange soft fruit with a single pit inside. At the core of the pit is the kernel, which can be pressed to yield apricot kernel oil. The oil is used in skincare products and as a culinary flavouring, and the kernels are sometimes used whole to make distilled liquors such as amaretto. The flavour of apricot kernels is almost identical to that of almonds, with a mixture of sweet and bitter which has been incorporated into many traditional Italian dishes.

History

The apricot, Prunus armeniaca, is a member of the rose family, along with peaches, plums, cherries, and Almond. The word apricot comes from the Latin praecocia meaning "precocious" or "early ripening." It first appeared in English print in 1551. Alexander the Great is said to have brought apricots from their native home in China to Greece in the fourth century B.C. The Arabs carried apricots to the Mediterranean, and the apricot became a main crop in Italy for centuries. Franciscan friars brought the apricot to America in the late 1800s, where they thrived.Today, the United States produces ninety percent of the world's apricot crop, with ninety percent of that U.S. crop grown in the state of California. There are hundreds of apricot varieties, but certain ones are more suitable for dried and processed fruits. Apricot trees are perfect for home gardens. They are easy to maintain, take up relatively little space, and the sweet-smelling flowers are an added benefit in spring.

Benefits

Apricot kernel oil is cold pressed and refined from the dried kernels of the apricot fruit. Rich in essential fatty acids like oleic and linoleic acid, apricot kernel oil is high in Vitamin A. Since it easily penetrates the skin, it is good oil for prematurely aged, dry or irritated skin. The excellent softening and moisturizing properties is great for face, hands and hair. It is light in colour with pleasant nutty odour and used in production of creams, balms, lotions and Cosmetics. World over people use massage therapy to help promote healthy skin, nourish and strengthen the body, relieve Stress, reduce pain, and encourage balance and well being. Apricot kernel oil massage opens and increases the flow of energy, balancing the entire nervous system and helping to release physical and emotional disharmony.

Nutritional profile

Sought out for its high vitamin E content and vitamin A and skin softening properties, apricot kernel oil is known for its ability to penetrate the skin without leaving an oily feel. Apricot kernel oil is also popular as massage oil and it used as carrier oil when used with essential oils for aromatherapy apricot Kernel oil is also rich in a broad spectrum of minerals and trace elements.

Disclaimer

The information provided in this fact sheet is for educational purposes only and must not be taken or interpreted as a suggestion or as medical advise. If you have any medical conditions you should consult your health care professional.
 
B

Ingredient . Basil

About Ingredient

Basil is a highly fragrant plant whose leaves are used as a seasoning herb for many different types of foods. Basil has become one of the most recognisable herbs around the world. Basil has round leaves that are at times pointed. They are green in colour, although some varieties contain some red or purple. Basil looks a little like peppermint, which is not surprising since they belong to the same plant family. There are more than 60 varieties of basil, all of which differ somewhat in appearance and taste. While the taste of sweet basil is bright and pungent, other varieties also offer unique tastes: lemon basil, anise basil and cinnamon basil all have flavours that subtly reflect their name. The scientific name for basil is Ocimum basilicum.

History

Basil now grows in many regions throughout the world, but it was first native to India, Asia and Africa. It is prominently featured in varied cuisines throughout the world including Italian, Thai, Vietnamese and Laotian. The name "basil" is derived from the old Greek word basilikohn, which means "royal," reflecting that ancient culture's attitudes towards an herb that they held to be very noble and sacred. The tradition of reverence of basil has continued in other cultures. In India, basil was cherished as an icon of hospitality, while in Italy, it was a symbol of love.

Benefits

Research studies on basil have shown unique health-protecting effects in two basic areas: basil's flavonoids and volatile oils. The unique array of active constituents called flavonoids found in basil provide protection at the cellular level. Orientin and vicenin are two water-soluble flavonoids that have been of particular interest in basil, and in studies on human white blood cells; these components of basil protect cell structures as well as chromosomes from radiation and oxygen-based damage. In addition, basil has been shown to provide protection against unwanted bacterial growth. These "antibacterial" properties of basil are not associated with its unique flavonoids, but instead with its volatile oils.

Nutritional profile

Basil is an excellent source of vitamin K and a very good source of iron, calcium and vitamin A. In addition, basil is a good source of dietary fibber, manganese, magnesium, acids and more.

Warnings

As with all herbs and medicinal plants basil should be consumed on in moderation.

Disclaimer

The information provided in this fact sheet is for educational purposes only and must not be taken or interpreted as a suggestion or as medical advise. If you have any medical conditions you should consult your health care professional.

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Ingredient . Celery

About Ingredient

Celery is a biennial vegetable (meaning it has a normal life cycle of two years) that belongs to the Umbelliferae family, whose other members include carrots, fennel, parsley and dill. While most people associate celery with its prized stalks, its leaves, roots and seeds are also used as a food and seasoning as well as a natural medicinal remedy. Celery grows to a height of 30 to 40 centre metres and is composed of leaf-topped stalks arranged in a conical shape and joined at a common base. The stalks have a crunchy texture and a delicate, but mildly salty, taste. The stalks in the centre are called the heart and are the most tender. In Australia we are used to celery appearing in different shades of green, but in Europe they also enjoy a variety that is white in colour. Like white asparagus, this type of celery is grown shaded from direct sunlight, so the production of its chlorophyll content, and hence its green colour, are inhibited.

History

The celery that we know today was derived from wild celery. While thought to have its origins in the Mediterranean regions of northern Africa and southern Europe, it was also native to areas extending east to the Himalayas. Wild celery differed a bit from its modern day counterpart in that it featured less stalks and more leaves. Celery has a long and prestigious history of use, first as a medicine and then later as a food. The initial mention of the medicinal properties of celery leaves dates back to the 9th century B.C., when celery made an appearance in the Odyssey, the famous epic by the Greek poet, Homer. The Ancient Greeks used the leaves as laurels to decorate their renowned athletes, while the ancient Romans used it as a seasoning, a tradition that has carried through the centuries.

Benefits

Celery contains many beneficial minerals and vitamins including vitamin C and several other active compounds that promote general wellbeing. Celery is an excellent source of vitamin C, a vitamin that helps to support the immune system. Vitamin C-rich foods like celery may help reduce cold symptoms or severity of cold symptoms; Over 20 scientific studies have concluded that vitamin C is a cold-fighter. Vitamin C also prevents the free radical damage that triggers the inflammatory cascade, and is therefore also associated with reduced severity of inflammatory conditions.

Nutritional profile

Celery contains vitamin K, vitamin C, potassium, folate, dietary fiber, molybdenum ,vitamin B6 (pyridoxine), calcium, vitamin B1 (thiamin), magnesium, vitamin A, tryptophan Phosphorus, vitamin B2 (riboflavin), iron and more.

Disclaimer

The information provided in this fact sheet is for educational purposes only and must not be taken or interpreted as a suggestion or as medical advise. If you have any medical conditions you should consult your health care professional.

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Ingredient . Chives

About Ingredient

Chives belong to the same plant family as onions, garlic, shallots, and leeks. They have long, hollow, grasslike stalks that get up to about 24 inches long. They generally grow in clumps. When the stalks are eaten they have a light but oniony flavour. The Latin name for chives is Allium Schoenoprasum. When left to flower, they develop light lavender, pom-pom-like flower. Chive is the name given to the smallest species of the onion family, which also includes onions, garlic, shallots and leeks. Chives can usually be seen in clumps and their stalks have a light, onion flavour. The leaves of chives are used, after shredding,

History

The first recorded use of chives occurred in China in about 3000 B.C.. Some say that Marco Polo brought the idea to use chives back with him from the East. (Marco Polo is credited with many of these types of idea migrations.) In any case there is no real evidence for their common use until about the 1500s when they found their way into both dishes and herb gardens. Like many of our words for herbs, "chive" comes to us from the Latin and via Old French. It originally comes from cepa (Latin) and cive (Old French). The first recorded use for the world in English was around 1400.

The botanical name actually comes from the Greek meaning, "reed-like. Chives are native to both Europe and Asia. It grows wild all across both regions, but there are slight variations in different locations. A variety found in the Alps is the one nearest to what is generally cultivated today. Medieval gardeners often planted chives around the borders for both decoration and to ward off harmful insects. It was thought that hanging bunches of chives around a house could also ward off evil.

Benefits

The nutritional value and health benefits of chives makes them ideal for maintaining optimum health and weight loss. Don't include too many chives in your diet if you're interested in weight gain.

Nutritional profile

Chives are low in Saturated Fat, Cholesterol, and Sodium and high in Dietary Fiber, Vitamin A, Vitamin C, Vitamin K, Riboflavin, Vitamin B6, Folate, Calcium, Iron, Magnesium, Potassium, Copper, Manganese, Thiamine, Niacin, Pantothenic Acid, Phosphorus and Zinc.

Disclaimer

The information provided in this fact sheet is for educational purposes only and must not be taken or interpreted as a suggestion or as medical advise. If you have any medical conditions you should consult your health care professional.

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Ingredient . Coconut Oils and Extracts

About Ingredient

Known as the "tree of life," the coconut palm is one of the most important agricultural crops of the Philippines. It yields timber; food; fermented and unfermented drink; alcohol; vinegar; thatching material; splints; strips and fibre for making baskets, mates, rope, hats, brushes, brooms, and other articles; fuel; caulking material; utensils for household use, such as cups, bowls, spoons, and the like; oil for food, cooking, illumination, for making soap, substitutes for butter and lard, ointments; and oil for cake for feeding domestic animals and for fertiliser.

History

The English name coconut, first mentioned in English print in 1555, comes from the Spanish and Portuguese word coco, which means "monkey face." Spanish and Portuguese explorers found a resemblance to a monkey's face in the three round indented markings or "eyes" found at the base of the coconut. On the Nicobar Islands of the Indian Ocean, whole coconuts were used as currency for the purchase of goods until the early part of the twentieth century. Coconut oil has been used for centuries as a vital source of food for health and general well being in traditional communities of tropical regions. Recent research verifies traditional beliefs that the coconut palm is .The Tree of Life.

Benefits

With all the health, nutritional, and beauty benefits that you get from coconut oil, there is no doubt why this has been hailed as the miracle oil. It is said to prevent and cure many sicknesses that are almost impossible to heal. Unlike most other oils, coconut oil is rich in medium chain fatty acids (or medium chain triglycerides), which are easier for the body to digest and less likely to be stored as fat in the body than other oils. This means that you get more of the good from this type of oil and less of the bad aspects of consuming oil.

Coconut oil contains lauric acid, which is also found in human breast milk. Lauric acid is an antibacterial and antiviral agent, could improve insulin production and thyroid function, it could reduce the risk of diabetes complications, and could even fight heart disease which is the leading cause of death. Coconut oil improves the performance of the digestive system that can make a person lose weight In general, skin problems are caused by free radicals. Free radicals are molecules that lost an electron making them steal electrons from other molecules in the body. Their frequent attacks can cause disruption of the cell and one of its ill effects is an unhealthy skin.

Nutritional profile

Coconut oil contain Calcium, magnesium, phosphorus, potassium ,sodium, iron, copper, zinc, selenium, fluoride. Plus a board spectrum of trace elements. Vitamins. A, C, D ,K B6 , B12 Folate, Amino Acids and more.

Disclaimer

The information provided in this fact sheet is for educational purposes only and must not be taken or interpreted as a suggestion or as medical advise. If you have any medical conditions you should consult your health care professional.

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Ingredient . Cress

About Ingredient

The plant features small, oval, deep green succulent leaves with high moisture content. The leaves feature sharp; peppery and slightly sour taste somewhat like mustard greens and garden cress (Lepidium sativum). Racemes of small white flowers appear in summer which turns in to small pods containing two rows of seeds. Ripe seeds are also edible.

History

The correct name for watercress is nasturtium officinale and it belongs to the family Cruciferea. Cress is native to Europe and Asia, common in Great Britain and widely naturalized in the United States and Canada. It has also been introduced into the West Indies and South America. Nasturtium officinale is called watercress in Great Britain and America, Brunnenkress in Germany, Crescione in Italy, and Nerokarthamon in Greece. As a matter of record, the Greek name Kardamon, broadly translated, means head subdoer and it was thought in ancient Greek in times that Watercress would cure a deranged mind.

Watercress is the most ancient of green vegetables known to man and its use can be traced back to the Persians, Greeks and Romans. In fact, a famous Persian chronicler advised Persians to feed cress to their children to improve bodily growth. He also strongly recommended its use to the Greek and Persians soldiers of that time. Although these eminent rulers knew nothing of such matters as mineral content and vitamins, they did observe that their soldiers were in better condition when this plant was made part of will and diet.

Benefits

This rich flavoured green leafy vegetable is store house of many phyto nutrients that have health promotional and disease prevention properties.

Nutritional profile

Water Cress rich source of minerals like copper, calcium, potassium, magnesium, manganese and phosphorus. Potassium in an important component of cell and body fluids that helps controlling heart rate and blood pressure by countering effects of sodium. Manganese is used by the body as a co-factor for the antioxidant enzyme superoxide dismutase. Calcium is required as bone/teeth mineral and in the regulation of heart and skeletal muscle activity. It is also rich in B-complex group of vitamins such as riboflavin, niacin, vitamin B-6 (pyridoxine), thiamin and pantothenic acid that are essential for optimum cellular metabolic functions.

Disclaimer

The information provided in this fact sheet is for educational purposes only and must not be taken or interpreted as a suggestion or as medical advise. If you have any medical conditions you should consult your health care professional.

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Ingredient . Eucalyptus

About Ingredient

1. History

The eucalyptus tree is native to Australia and was first used by Aboriginal people to treat coughs and colds. "Lloyds History of Vegetable Drugs", written in 1922, give us a window into its former uses. "Eucalyptus globulus, and other species of eucalyptus, are indigenous to Australia, where the leaves are employed by the natives as a remedy for intermittent fever. It was thus introduced to Europeans towards the middle of the 19th century. Possibly its employment by the crew of the ship La Favorita, who in the vicinity of Botany Bay were nearly decimated by fever, from which they recovered through the use of an infusion of the leaves of eucalyptus, first through the efforts of Dr. Eydoux and M. de Salvy, gave the drug conspicuity. Dr. Ramel, of Valencia, however, has the credit of introducing the drug to the Academy of Medicine, 1866, thus brining it to the attention of the medical profession, by whom it is now used in extract form, in other directions than that for which it was originally commended. The distilled oil of eucalyptus has now an extended reputation and use. The date of the first use of eucalyptus by the natives of Australia is unknown.

2. Benefits

Nutritional profile

Eucalyptus contains a cocktail of compounds that make it active in infections. Perhaps the most famous are its oils. Eucalyptol, one of its oils, has been found to be expectorant, decongestant, pain relieving, anticough, and bacteria killing. The long held traditional uses in recurrent infections suggest Eucalyptus contains immune system stimulating constituents, though this has not been studied as of yet.

Precautions and side effects

Unlike pharmaceutical companies, the manufacturers of herbs and supplements do not have the same mechanism for reporting adverse effects associated with the use of their products. Therefore data on adverse effects is limited. Life-threatening poisonings have been reported from overdoses of eucalyptus oil. Initial symptoms of toxicity are epigastric pain and vomiting, followed by central nervous system depression, and coma. Other potential adverse effects include nausea, vomiting, and diarrhoea.

Only a few drops of Eucalyptus oil are enough to cause life-threatening poisoning in some children. Adults have been poisoned with only 4 to 5 millilitres. Symptoms of overdose include a drop in blood pressure, circulation problems, collapse, and asphyxiation. In the event of overdose, you should seek emergency medical treatment immediately.

Disclaimer

The information provided in this fact sheet is for educational purposes only and must not be taken or interpreted as a suggestion or as medical advise. If you have any medical conditions you should consult your health care professional.

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Ingredient . Frankincense

About Ingredient

 

Frankincense essential oil has been considered a valuable and precious oil since ancient times. Today, Frankincense has a number of uses in aromatherapy, in cosmetics, in skin creams and in more modern times is being researched for medicines particularly in cancer research . The Frankincense plant is mainly grown in the Middle East. It has a very refreshing, pleasant, woody, balsamic smell.

History

The Egyptian queen Hathsepia (15th century B.C.) had an inscription carved on her tomb which refers to frankincense; in fact, the ancient Egyptians spent a substantial amount of money importing frankincense from the Phoenicians because of its perceived value. In religion, it was burned in temples. Frankincense was also used in perfumes, medicines and cosmetics. It was used to fragrance clothing too. The Egyptians had a number of other uses for frankincense using it as an incense, as a kohl eyeliner (from the charred resin of frankincense), as an embalming agent for the dead and for the treatment of wounds and skin ulcers. Egyptian women saw frankincense as a beauty aid and used it in face masks to protect and rejuvenate their skin. The word Frankincense has been derived from the French word 'Franc', which means flourishing. It was first used as real incense after mixing with Myrrh. Ancient Egyptians used it as an offering to the Gods. Another popular use was in the form of a soothing face pack. It was also considered to ward off the evil eye. The Hebrews presented Frankincense as an offering to baby Jesus.

Benefits

Frankincense oil is of great utility in relieving the muscle pain. It also helps to lessen the pain caused by rheumatism. For rejuvenation, there can be no better idea than to go in for Frankincense essential oil massage. It has a very peaceful and calming effect on the mind, thus it helps to perk up and revive the lost energy. It is very effective in fighting with respiratory disorders. It is known to deliver beneficial results in combating anxiety, asthma, bronchitis, stress, cough, scars & stretch marks.

 

Disclaimer

The information provided in this fact sheet is for educational purposes only and must not be taken or interpreted as a suggestion or as medical advise. If you have any medical conditions you should consult your health care professional.
 

G

Ingredient . Garlic

About Ingredient

Garlic is arranged in a head, called a "bulb," which averages about 50 millimetres in height and diameter and consists of numerous small separate cloves. Both the cloves and the entire bulb are encased in paper-like sheathes that can be white, off-white, or have a pink/purple hue. Although garlic cloves have a firm texture, they can be easily cut or crushed. The taste of garlic is like no other-it hits the palate with a hot pungency that is shadowed by a very subtle background sweetness. While elephant garlic has larger cloves, it is more closely related to the leek and therefore does not offer the full health benefits of regular garlic.

History

Native to central Asia, garlic is one of the oldest cultivated plants in the world and has been grown for over 5000 years. Ancient Egyptians seem to have been the first to cultivate this plant that played an important role in their culture. Garlic was not only bestowed with sacred qualities and placed in the tomb of Pharaohs, but it was given to the slaves that built the Pyramids to enhance their endurance and strength. This strength-enhancing quality was also honoured by the ancient Greeks and Romans, civilizations whose athletes ate garlic before sporting events and whose soldiers consumed it before going off to war. Garlic was introduced into various regions throughout the globe by migrating cultural tribes and explorers.

By the 6th century BC, garlic was known in both China and India, the latter country using it for therapeutic purposes. Throughout the millennia, garlic has been a beloved plant in many cultures for both its culinary and medicinal properties. Over the last few years, it has gained unprecedented popularity since researchers have been scientifically validating its numerous health benefit. Currently, China, South Korea, India, Spain and the United States are among the top commercial producers of garlic.

Benefits

Garlic's health benefits have long been known. Garlic has been considered a herbal "wonder drug", with a reputation in folklore for preventing everything from the common cold and flu to the Plague! It has been used extensively in herbal medicine (phytotherapy, sometimes spelt phitotherapy). Raw garlic is used by some to treat the symptoms of acne and there is some evidence that it can assist in managing high cholesterol levels. It can even be effective as a natural mosquito repellent.

In general, a stronger tasting clove of garlic has more sulphur content and hence more medicinal value it's likely to have. Some people have suggested that organically grown garlic tends towards a higher sulphur level and hence greater benefit to health.

Nutritional profile

The sulphur compounds in garlic are perhaps its most unique nutrients. There are literally dozens of well-studied sulphur molecules in garlic, and virtually all of them have been shown to function as antioxidants. In addition, many provide us with anti-inflammatory benefits. The very presence of sulfur in some many different garlic compounds may also play an important role in our nourishment. Additionally, garlic is an excellent source of manganese. It is also a very good source of vitamin B6 and vitamin C. In addition, garlic is a good source of protein and thiamin (vitamin B1) as well as the minerals phosphorus, selenium, calcium, potassium, and copper.

Precautions and side effects

Raw garlic is very strong, so eating too much could produce problems, for example irritation of or even damage to the digestive tract.

There are a few people who are allergic to garlic. Symptoms of garlic allergy include skin rash, temperature and headaches. Also, garlic could potentially disrupt anti-coagulants, so it's best avoided before surgery. As with any medicine, always check with your doctor first and tell your doctor if you are using it.

Disclaimer

The information provided in this fact sheet is for educational purposes only and must not be taken or interpreted as a suggestion or as medical advise. If you have any medical conditions you should consult your health care professional.

G

Ingredient . Grape

About Ingredient

Grapes are small round or oval berries that feature semi-translucent flesh encased by a smooth skin. Some contain edible seeds while others are seedless. Like blueberries, grapes are covered by a protective, whitish bloom. Grapes that are eaten as is or used in a recipe are called table grapes as opposed to wine grapes (used in viniculture) or raisin grapes (used to make dried fruit.

Grapes that are eaten from the vine are called table grapes, as opposed to wine grapes (used in viniculture) or raisin grapes (used to make dried fruit). While there are thousands of varieties of grapes, only about 20 constitute the majority of table grapes consumed. Color, size, taste and physical characteristics differ amongst the varieties. Grapes come in a variety of colors including green, amber, red, blue-black, and purple.

In general, whole grapes have a slightly crunchy texture and a dry, sweet and tart taste.

History

Grapes have a long and abundant history. While they've grown wild since prehistoric times, evidence suggests they were cultivated in Asia as early as 5000 BC. The grape also played a role in numerous biblical stories, being referred to as the "fruit of the vine." Grapes were also pictured in hieroglyphics in ancient Egyptian burial tombs.

During the ancient Greek and Roman civilizations, grapes were revered for their use in winemaking. They were planted in the Rhine Valley in Germany, a place of notable wine production, in the 2nd century AD.

Around this time, over 90 varieties of grapes were already known. As European travellers explored the globe, they brought the grape with them. Grapes were first planted in the United States in the early 17th century at a Spanish mission in New Mexico. From there, they quickly spread to the central valley of California where climate, and absence of grape-preying insects, best supported their production.

In the late 19th century, almost all of the vinifera varieties of grapes in France were destroyed by an insect that was unintentionally brought from North America. Fortunately, agriculturists crossbred some of the vinifera variety with the American labrusca variety and were able to continue the cultivation of grapes in this region, one that is famous for its grapes and wine.

Benefits

Over 100 research studies on grapes (or products made from them, like red wine) have shown many of their health benefits to come from a category of phytonutrients called polyphenols. Three types of polyphenols seem most important with respect to grapes and their health benefits: (1) flavonoids, (2) phenolic acids, and (3) resveratrol. Interestingly, all three types of polyphenols appear to be most concentrated in the skins, stems, and seeds of grapes rather than their juicy middle sections.

Nutritional profile

Grapes are excellent phytochemicals that are antioxidant compounds and also contain vitamin B6 (pyridoxine), potassium, vitamin B1 (thiamin, vitamin C, manganese and a spectrum of trace minerals.

Precautions and side effects

To much red wine or red grape juice (excess) may cause head aces and anyone consuming red wine should drink in moderation to protect your body against the affect of alcohol.

Disclaimer

The information provided in this fact sheet is for educational purposes only and must not be taken or interpreted as a suggestion or as medical advise. If you have any medical conditions you should consult your health care professional.

K

Ingredient . Kelp

About Ingredient

Kelp is large brown algae from the Pacific Ocean. Any plant growing in the sea is seaweed. Seaweeds are algae. The large brown algae, kelp, is harvested, dried and ground. This material is used for kelp tablets and seaweed powder. The composition of seaweed is 5.7% protein 2.6% fat, 7.0% fiber, 58.6% nitrogen free extract, 15.4% ash and 10.7% moisture. Nutritional value of kelp is dependent on the species, season, temperature of the water and geographic area.

History

Some scientists believe that maritime people boated from Japan to Alaska along the Aleutian and Kurile Islands thousands of years ago. Before that, people may have island-hopped their way to Australia using kelp for nutrition.

Scientists have discovered settlements thousands of years old along the coasts of some of these Pacific islands, which also have ecologically-rich kelp forests nearby that Erlandson believes existed when people were island hopping. The remains of kelp resources have been discovered in a settlement in Daisy Cave in the Channel Islands off southern California, dated thousands of years old.

The fact that productive kelp forests are found adjacent to some of the earliest coastal archaeological sites in the Americas supports the idea that such forests may have facilitated human coastal migrations around the Pacific Rim.

Benefits

Why would anyone want to eat sea vegetables? Because they offer the broadest range of minerals of any food, containing virtually all the minerals found in the ocean-the same minerals that are found in human blood. Sea vegetables are an excellent source of iodine and vitamin K, a very good source of the B-vitamin folate, and magnesium, and a good source of iron and calcium, and the B-vitamins riboflavin and pantothenic acid. In addition, sea vegetables contain good amounts of lignans, plant compounds with cancer-protective properties.

Nutritional profile

Kelp contains the following nutrients but are not limited to:- vitamin A IU, vitamin A RE, A - carotenoid, A - retinol, A - beta carotene, thiamin - B1, riboflavin - B2, niacin - B3, niacin equiv, vitamin B6, vitamin B12, biotin, vitamin C, vitamin D IU, vitamin D mcg vitamin E alpha equiv, vitamin E IU, vitamin E mg, folate, vitamin K, pantothenic acid,, boron, calcium, chloride, chromium, copper, fluoride, iodine, iron, magnesium, manganese, molybdenum, phosphorus potassium, selenium, sodium, zinc and other trace minerals.

Precautions and side effects

Excessive amounts of kelp may cause diarrhoea.

Disclaimer

The information provided in this fact sheet is for educational purposes only and must not be taken or interpreted as a suggestion or as medical advise. If you have any medical conditions you should consult your health care professional.

L

Ingredient . Lavender

About Ingredient

Indigenous to the mountain zones of the Mediterranean, lavender thrives in stony habitats that have access to lots of sunlight. Lavender can be found growing in the wild throughout southern Europe. Lavender is actually a shrub with heavy branches that grows up to about 60 cm. Wood-like branches grow from the broad rootstock and green leaf-like shoots resembling rods protrude out from the branches. The narrow, grayish green leaves covered in a silver blanket-like substance taper down from the base. The leaves are oblong in shape and attach directly at the base in curled spiral-like patterns.

Lavender is frequently alluded to as a natural remedy for a large variety of ailments. Lavender is primarily used in connection with insomnia, anxiety, depression, and mood disturbances. This is due to recent and past studies showing lavender's effectiveness in producing calming, soothing, and anticonvulsive effects in those who use it.

History

The word " lavender " comes from the Latin lavare means " to wash". The Romans added lavender to their bath water so it is likely that the herb become synonymous with the ritual of bathing. Long Ago, Egyptians using lavender for mummification and perfume. While, The Romans used lavender oils for bathing, cooking, and scenting the air. In this Modern Time, Lavender were famous since the French chemist Rene-Maurice Gattefosse, who discovered the use of lavender to healed his burn quickly without scarring and he subsequently discovered the excellent antiseptic qualities of many other. Nowadays, lavender is grown in many parts of the world for commercial use and the Provence region of France is widely renowned as a world leader in growing and producing Lavender.

Benefits

One of the primary things lavender essential oil is used for is to calm the nervous system. The scent of lavender is known to be calming. In tonics it is used to treat headaches, anxiety, depression, emotional stress, and nervous tension. The health benefits of lavender in this capacity can be gained through any type of scent release such as a diffuser, candle, perfume, tonic, or personal product. Another known health benefit of lavender is its ability to relieve pain. Lavender essential oil can ease pain from sore muscles, tension, arthritis, sprains, and pain in the joints. To take advantage of the pain relieving properties of lavender, you could use it in an oil. You can massage lavender essential oil directly on sore muscles or use it in combination with other essential oils for combined benefit.

Nutritional profile

Lavender contains essential oils and a broad spectrum of minerals and trace elements.

Precautions and side effects

As with any essential oil or natural supplement, caution should be used when you are using lavender essential oil medicinally. Certain groups within the population should avoid using lavender for its health benefits.

This includes those who are diabetic and women who are pregnant or breastfeeding. Additionally, those who have sensitive skin should use lavender essential oil with increased caution.

Disclaimer

The information provided in this fact sheet is for educational purposes only and must not be taken or interpreted as a suggestion or as medical advise. If you have any medical conditions you should consult your health care professional.

L

Ingredient . Leek

About Ingredient

Leeks, known scientifically as Allium porrum, are related to garlic, and to onions, shallots and scallions.

Leeks look like large scallions, having a very small bulb and a long white cylindrical stalk of superimposed layers that flows into green, tightly wrapped, flat leaves. Cultivated leeks are usually about 12 inches in length and one to two inches in diameter, and feature a fragrant flavor that is reminiscent of shallots but sweeter and more subtle. Wild leeks, known as "ramps," are much smaller in size, but have a stronger, more intense flavour.

History

Leeks enjoy a long and rich history, one that can trace its heritage back through antiquity. Thought to be native to Central Asia, they have been cultivated in this region and in Europe for thousands of years.

Leeks were prized by the ancient Greeks and Romans and were especially revered for their beneficial effect upon the throat. The Greek philosopher Aristotle credited the clear voice of the partridge to a diet of leeks, while the Roman emperor Nero supposedly ate leeks everyday to make his voice stronger.

The Romans are thought to have introduced leeks to the United Kingdom, where they were able to flourish because they could withstand cold weather. Leeks have attained an esteemed status in Wales, where they serve as this country's national emblem. The Welsh regard for leeks can be traced back to a battle that they successfully won against that Saxons in 1620, during which the Welsh soldiers placed leeks in their caps to differentiate themselves from their opponents. Today, leeks are an important vegetable in many northern European cuisines and are grown in many European countries.

Benefits

Leeks are a very good source of manganese and a good source of vitamin C, iron, folate and vitamin B6.

For an in-depth nutritional profile. Leeks, like garlic and onions, belong to a vegetable family called the Allium vegetables. Since leeks are related to garlic and onions, they contain many of the same beneficial compounds found in these well-researched, health-promoting vegetables. Lower LDL Cholesterol while rising HDL Cholesterol.

A high intake of Allium vegetables has been shown to reduce total cholesterol and LDL, or "bad" cholesterol levels, while at the same time raising HDL, or "good" cholesterol levels. This can be very important for preventing the development or progression of the blood vessel plaques that occur in atherosclerosis and diabetic heart disease. If these plaques grow too large or rupture, the result can be a heart attack or stroke.

Allium vegetables have also been shown to lower high blood pressure, another risk factor for heart attack and stroke.

Nutritional profile

.Although less well-researched than their fellow allium vegetables (especially garlic and onions), leeks nevertheless contain many sulphur compounds that are either similar to, or identical with, sulphur compounds in these better-researched vegetables. They also contain an impressive amount of polyphenols, including the flavonoids kaempferol. In and of itself, the considerable amount of sulphur found in leeks may play an important role in support of our body's antioxidant and detox systems as well as the formation of our connective tissue. Leeks are a very good source of manganese and a good source of vitamin C, iron, folate, and vitamin B6.

The folate found in leeks is partly present in the bioactive form of 5-methyltetrahydrofolate (5-MTHF).

Precautions and side effects

Leeks are among a small number of foods that contain measurable amounts of oxalates, naturally occurring substances found in plants, animals, and human beings. When oxalates become too concentrated in body fluids, they can crystallize and cause health problems. For this reason, individuals with already existing and untreated kidney or gallbladder problems may want to avoid eating leeks.

Disclaimer

The information provided in this fact sheet is for educational purposes only and must not be taken or interpreted as a suggestion or as medical advise. If you have any medical conditions you should consult your health care professional.

L

Ingredient . Lemon Myrtle

About Ingredient

Lemon Myrtle (Backhousia citriodora) is a Queensland rainforest tree growing to 8 metres in height, although if regularly pruned it can be kept to bush size and is therefore suitable for home gardens. The leaves, growing to 10cm in length, are rich in lemon oil. Citral accounts for over 90% of the plants essential oil (note: lemons have approximately 3% citral). Lemon myrtle has an abundance of uses. Its leaves can be used fresh or dried and the oil can be extracted through distillation. Fresh or ground dried leaf has endless applications in sweet or savoury dishes and drinks.

History

Backhousia citriodora was named by Baron Ferdinand von Müller in 1853 after James Backhouse (1794-1869), an English nurseryman and keen botany collector. Backhouse was an early Quaker missionary who visited Australia in 1832-8, making observations of Australian flora and fauna as well as writing about Australian society at the time In 1889 Joseph H. Maiden reported the potential use of Lemon Myrtle for commercial production and Schimmel & Co analysed the species in 1888 for chemical properties identifying citral for the first time.

Benefits

The high levels of citral in the leaves is noteworthy, as citral is a component that has been found to relieve cramps, spasms, rheumatism, headaches, fevers and have an anti-cancer effect. Studies have shown that the citral can inhibit the growth of Helicobacter pylori, the pathogen that has been found to be a cause of ulcers and other gastroduodenal diseases. Lemon myrtle also has been found to be beneficial to muscles and connective tissue, for reducing cellulite, and to strengthen the immune system.

Nutritional profile

Lemon Myrtle is a unique rain forest tree that contains essential oils with very high qualities. This product contains high amounts of potassium, sodium and an abundance of trace elements. High quality lemon myrtle oil will have a higher amount of potassium in it. The higher the mineral content in a plant the more energy can be produced from it.

Precautions and side effects

All essential oils in their strong pure form can be poisonous or toxic, essential oils have very high madisinal qualities but should be handed according to the directions.

Disclaimer

The information provided in this fact sheet is for educational purposes only and must not be taken or interpreted as a suggestion or as medical advise. If you have any medical conditions you should consult your health care professional.

L

Ingredient . Lovage

About Ingredient

It is a large, hardy perennial plant (some report it growing up to nine feet tall, but even six feet is not unusual) of which all parts, from root to stem to leaf to seeds, are usefully edible. The commonest use is the leaves, which are an herb said to taste largely of celery (perhaps, say some, with a light overtone of anise), and many who grow it find it a simpler and in many ways better replacement for celery (as one put it, "you never need to buy celery or parsley again--other than for celery sticks with Chez Whiz"). While we would disagree quite vigorously with the parsley part, we are inclined to agree with the celery part. It is, though, very strongly flavoured, and needs to be used with a correspondingly light hand.

History

The name, Lovage, is said to be derived from two Latin words, Levisticum and Ligusticum (two botanical names for the genus), meaning Ligurian, because the herb flourished in ancient times in Liguria, a region that includes the Italian Riviera. These terms became garbled over the years, and by the time it entered English, in Chaucer's day, the name became corrupted beyond recognition. Misled by the name, Lovage, many people over the years have fancied a connection between Lovage and love potions (perhaps because it also sweetens the breath?). It became a popular medication in the fourteenth century, probably because of its aromatic qualities and was widely used for fevers and "pestilential disorders." In the New World, New Englanders planted Lovage for its roots, which they candied and used as a sweet and a breath lozenge, and nineteenth-century Shaker religious communities grew and sold Lovage as part of their commercial enterprises. It was formerly widely utilized for culinary purposes and eaten as a vegetable.

Benefits

Lovage is mainly used as a diuretic, which encourages urine flow. The additional urine is said to be helpful in cases of urinary difficulties and cystitis. It is also used to eliminate excess retained water.

The increased urine flow promoted by Lovage also helps to flush the kidneys, which is said to be beneficial in eliminating gravel and kidney stones.

Lovage is considered a stomachic, an agent that strengthens and improves stomach function. The bitter principle in Lovage also works to improve the appetite and relieve indigestion and colic , gastric, catarrh and general disorders of the stomach. Lovage is particularly effective when used to relieve flatulence. Both ancient Greek writers and modern pharmacologists have extolled the benefits of the herb's powers to relieve gas and griping (the grumbling and pain associated with gas).

Nutritional profile

Lovage contains a broad spectrum of minerals and amino acids.

Disclaimer

The information provided in this fact sheet is for educational purposes only and must not be taken or interpreted as a suggestion or as medical advise. If you have any medical conditions you should consult your health care professional.

M

Ingredient . Marjoram

About Ingredient

In the age of pharaohs, marjoram was used in manufacturing perfumes because of the essential oil it carried in the flowering tips of the herb. Today it is more of a seasoning herb despite the fact that it is also used in cosmetics.

History

Marjoram (Satureja hortensis) is an aromatic perennial herb. Specific to the Mediterranean climate, the herb originated in Egypt and Arabia.

Benefits

For marjoram we present the following therapeutic indications which can be used in cases of: anorexia, insomnia, neurosis, abdominal pain (enterocolitis, pancreatitis, appendicitis, neurovegetative disorders), flu, fever, vomit, diarrhea, hepatitis, children's malnutrition, cutaneous eruptions, pruritus (itchy skin). It is a good diuretic and appetite stimulant.

Nutritional profil

The synthesized essential marjoram oil is formed of a number of active substances such as terpinen, terpineol, carvacrol, ursolic acid, beta sistosterine. Along with the essential oil, tannin, bitter and sistosterine elements, marjoram is also rich in vitamins A and D. Because of these compounds, marjoram stimulates digestion, increases diuresis, absorbs gases, increases food appetite and it is recommended in nervous states or cases of insomnia.

Disclaimer

The information provided in this fact sheet is for educational purposes only and must not be taken or interpreted as a suggestion or as medical advise. If you have any medical conditions you should consult your health care professional.

M

Ingredient . (Plant) Minerals

Minerals are inorganic elements which mean that no living thing, plant or animal is able to manufacture or create them. They have to be obtained externally from the food of the plant, animal or human.
In the case of plants, the minerals have to come from the soil in which they are grown, but human beings cant readily absorb minerals directly from the soil. In their case, the minerals have to come from the plants and foods they eat. It stands to reason that if the animals and the humans are relying on the minerals being in the plants and the plants are relying on the minerals being in the soil, mineral deficient soils will lead to mineral deficient animals and humans. In this way, we are totally dependent on the plants to provide us with the minerals we need to survive.

Plant derived colloidal minerals

The minerals that come from a plant are by far the most bio-available source of minerals outside a fresh food store. They have been assimilated or digested by the plant by a process of photosynthesis which turns them into a carbon based organic molecule know as a water soluble, plant derived, hydrophilic mineral or colloidal mineral. According to food chemistry, plant derived minerals are 98% 10 100% absorbed by the body. Generally they are 200 to 2,000 times smaller than metallic mineral. Some colloidal minerals are no larger than 0.0000001 micron and are capable of being absorbed readily into the bloodstream.

Plant derived colloidal minerals are water soluble and carry natural negative electrical charge. This has two very important benefits. One, It greatly enhances the transport, availability and absorbability of other nutrients from foods and or vitamins and other supplements and two, it will attract toxins and heavy metals from the body and flush them out.

A colloid is a particle substance that remains its identity and remains no suspension. Yet, not all colloid minerals are plant derived and are then, therefore, metallic colloidal Minerals. These minerals are not negatively charged and are not as easily assimilated or absorbed. Comparing metallic colloidal minerals to plant derived colloidal minerals is like comparing sawdust to oatmeal. Metallic colloidal minerals can still be considered to be a toxic and build up in the body the same as other metallic minerals.

Some uses of minerals in the body


·  The formation of blood and bone
·  The proper composition of body fluids
·  The maintenance of healthy nerve functions
·  The regulation of muscle tone
·  The regulation of the heart beat and cardiovascular system
·  Used in energy production
·  Used for healing growth
·  Used to utilise vitamins and other nutrients
·  Used by the body to produce enzymes
·  Essential part of hormone structures
·  Play a critical role in the synthesis of DNA
·  Helps balance pH levels
·  Helps neutralise or reverse effects of toxic metals
·  Immunity function
·  As a catalyst, speeding up chemicals reaction in the body

Many plants have a broad spectrum of minerals so when we consume plants we get a broad spectrum of minerals in our bodies trough the food we eat. The trouble we have in today's society is that many of our foods are lacking some of the important nutrients we require to maintain a healthy body so we are told to supplement and many supplements are metallic.

O

Ingredient . Onion

About Ingredient

Onions, like garlic, are members of the Allium family, and both are rich in powerful sulphur-containing compounds that are responsible for their pungent odors and for many of their health-promoting effects.

Onions contain allyl propyl disulphide, while garlic is rich in allicin, diallyl disulphide, diallyl trisulphide and others. In addition, onions are very rich in chromium, a trace mineral that helps cells respond to insulin, plus vitamin C, and numerous flavonoids, most notably, quercitin.

History

Onions are native to Asia and the Middle East and have been cultivated for over five thousand years. Onions were highly regarded by the Egyptians. Not only did they use them as currency to pay the workers who built the pyramids, but they also placed them in the tombs of kings, such as Tutankhamen, so that they could carry these gifts bestowed with spiritual significance with them to the afterlife.

Onions have been revered throughout time not only for their culinary use, but also for their therapeutic properties. As early as the 6th century, onions were used as a medicine in India. While they were popular with the ancient Greeks and Romans, they were oftentimes dressed with extra seasonings since many people did not find them spicy enough. Yet, it was their pungency that made onions popular among poor people throughout the world who could freely use this inexpensive vegetable to spark up their meals.

Onions were an indispensable vegetable in the cuisines of many European countries during the Middle Ages and later even served as a classic healthy breakfast food.

Benefits

The regular consumption of onions has, like garlic, been shown to lower high cholesterol levels and high blood pressure, both of which help prevent atherosclerosis and diabetic heart disease, and reduce the risk of heart attack or stroke. These beneficial effects are likely due to onions' sulphur compounds, its chromium and its vitamin B6, which helps prevent heart disease by lowering high homocysteine levels, another significant risk factor for heart attack and stroke.

Onions have been singled out as one of the small number of vegetables and fruits that contributed to the significant reduction in heart disease risk seen in a meta-analysis of seven prospective studies. Of the more than 100,000 individuals who participated in these studies, those who diets most frequently included onions, tea, apples and broccoli-the richest sources of flavonoids-gained a 20% reduction in their risk of heart disease.

Nutritional profile

Onions are a very good source of vitamin C, chromium and dietary fiber. They are also a good source of manganese, molybdenum, vitamin B6, folate, potassium, phosphorus, copper and a broad spectrum of minerals and nutrients.

Precautions and side effects

Onions may cause irritation to the eyes.

Disclaimer

The information provided in this fact sheet is for educational purposes only and must not be taken or interpreted as a suggestion or as medical advise. If you have any medical conditions you should consult your health care professional.

P

Ingredient . Parsley

About Ingredient

While parsley is a wonderfully nutritious and healing food, it is often under-appreciated. Most people do not realize that this vegetable has more uses than just being a decorative garnish that accompanies restaurant meals. They do not know that parsley is actually a storehouse of nutrients and that it features a delicious green and vibrant taste.

The two most popular types of parsley are curly parsley and Italian flat leaf parsley. The Italian variety has a more fragrant and less bitter taste than the curly variety. There is also another type of parsley known as turnip-rooted (or Hamburg) that is cultivated for its roots, which resemble salsify and burdock. Parsley belongs to the Umbelliferae family of plants, and its Latin name is Petroselinum crispum.

History

Parsley is native to the Mediterranean region of Southern Europe. While it has been cultivated for more than 2,000 years, parsley was used medicinally prior to being consumed as a food. The ancient Greeks held parsley to be sacred, using it to not only adorn victors of athletic contests, but also for decorating the tombs of the deceased. The practice of using parsley as a garnish actually has a long history that can be traced back to the civilization of the ancient Romans.

Benefits

Parsley is a good source of folic acid, one of the most important B vitamins. While it plays numerous roles in the body, one of its most critical roles in relation to cardiovascular health is its necessary participation in the process through which the body converts homocysteine into benign molecules. Homocysteine is a potentially dangerous molecule that, at high levels, can directly damage blood vessels, and high levels of homocysteine are associated with a significantly increased risk of heart attack and stroke in people with atherosclerosis or diabetic heart disease. Enjoying foods rich in folic acid, like parsley, is an especially good idea for individuals who either have, or wish to prevent, these diseases. Folic acid is also a critical nutrient for proper cell division and is therefore vitally important for cancer-prevention in two areas of the body that contain rapidly dividing cells-the colon, and in women, the cervix.

Nutritional profile

.Parsley is an excellent source of vitamin A, vitamin C, and vitamin K. It is a good source of iron and folate.

Parsley's volatile oil components include myristicin, limonene, eugenol, and alpha-thujene. Its flavonoids include apiin, apigenin, crisoeriol, and luteolin.

Disclaimer

The information provided in this fact sheet is for educational purposes only and must not be taken or interpreted as a suggestion or as medical advise. If you have any medical conditions you should consult your health care professional.

P

Ingredient . Pineapple

About Ingredient

Pineapple, Ananas comosus, belongs to the Bromeliaceae family, from which one of its most important health-promoting compounds, the enzyme bromelain, was named. The Spanish name for pineapple, pina, and the root of its English name, reflects the fruit's visual similarity to the pinecone. Pineapples are actually not just one fruit but a composite of many flowers whose individual fruitlets fuse together around a central core. Each fruitlet can be identified by an "eye," the rough spiny marking on the pineapple's surface.

History

Although thought to have originated in South America, pineapples were first discovered by Europeans in 1493 on the Caribbean island that came to be known as Guadalupe. When Columbus and other discovers brought pineapples back to Europe, attempts were made to cultivate the sweet, prized fruit until it was realized that the fruit's need for a tropical climate inhibited its ability to flourish in this region. By the end of the 16th century, Portuguese and Spanish explorers introduced pineapples into many of their Asian, African and South Pacific colonies, countries in which the pineapple is still being grown today.

Benefits

Bromelain is a complex mixture of substances that can be extracted from the stem and core fruit of the pineapple. Among dozens of components known to exist in this crude extract, the best studied components are a group of protein-digesting enzymes (called cysteine proteinases). Originally, researchers believed that these enzymes provided the key health benefits found in bromelain, a popular dietary supplement containing these pineapple extracts. In addition, researchers believed that these benefits were primarily limited to help with digestion in the intestinal tract. However, further studies have shown that bromelain has a wide variety of health benefits, and that many of these benefits may not be related to the different enzymes found in this extract. Excessive inflammation, excessive coagulation of the blood, and certain types of tumor growth may all be reduced by therapeutic doses of bromelain when taken as a dietary supplement. Studies are not available, however, to show these same potential benefits in relationship to normal intake of pineapple within a normal meal plan.

Nutritional profile

Pineapple is an excellent source the trace mineral manganese, which is an essential cofactor in a number of enzymes important in energy production and antioxidant defenses. For example, the key oxidative enzyme superoxide dismutase, which disarms free radicals produced within the mitochondria (the energy production factories within our cells), requires manganese. Just one cup of fresh pineapple supplies 128.0% of the DV for this very important trace mineral. In addition to manganese, pineapple is a good source of thiamin, a B vitamin that acts as a cofactor in enzymatic reactions central to energy production.

Precautions and side effects

Pineapple is not a commonly allergenic food, is not known to contain measurable amounts of oxalates or purines and is also not included in the Environmental Working Group's 2010 report "Pesticides in Produce" as one of the 12 foods most frequently containing pesticide residues. In fact, pineapple is often used as a fruit in allergy avoidance diets partly for these reasons, and for its bromelain (digestive enzyme) component.

Disclaimer

The information provided in this fact sheet is for educational purposes only and must not be taken or interpreted as a suggestion or as medical advise. If you have any medical conditions you should consult your health care professional.

R

Ingredient . Rosemary

About Ingredient

It is not surprising that the taste and aroma of the herb rosemary, historically used for strengthening the memory, is unforgettable. Rosemary has a unique pine-like fragrant flavor that is balanced by a rich pungency, a combination that evokes both the forest and the sea. Its memorable flavor and unique health benefits makes it an indispensable herb for every kitchen. Rosemary grows on a small evergreen shrub belonging to the Labiatae family that is related to mint. Its leaves look like flat pine-tree needles, deep green in color on top while silver-white on their underside.

History

Although rosemary is native to the Mediterranean, it now grows throughout much of the temperate regions in Europe and America. Rosemary has been a prized seasoning and natural medicine for millennia. Part of rosemary's popularity came from the widespread belief that rosemary stimulated and strengthened the memory, a quality for which it is still traditionally used. In ancient Greece, students would place rosemary sprigs in their hair when studying for exams, and mourners would also throw the fragrant herb into the grave of the deceased as a symbol of remembrance. In olde England, rosemary's ability to fortify the memory transformed it into a symbol of fidelity, and it played an important role in the costumes, decorations and gifts used at weddings. Rosemary oil was first extracted in the 14th century, after which it was used to make Queen of Hungary water, a very popular cosmetic used at that time. In the 16th and 17th centuries, rosemary became popular as a digestive aid in apothecaries. Recently, as modern research focuses on the beneficial active components in rosemary, our appreciation for this herb's therapeutic as well as culinary value has been renewed.

Benefits

The essential rosemary oil is a main ingredient in the industry of cosmetic products because of its analgesic, aromatizing, anti-inflammatory, peripheral blood circulation stimulating, antimicrobial and hair fall preventing action. Adding a few drops in a votive light or in the bath water, the essential rosemary oil is adequate for states of anxiety, headaches, debility, and weakness. It acts through unblocking the interior energies and in aromatherapy it is believed to help improve relationships with others.

Nutritional profile

Rosemary is a good source of the minerals iron and calcium, as well as dietary fiber. Fresh has 25% more manganese (which is somehow lost in the process of drying) and a 40% less calcium and iron, probably due to the higher water content.

Precautions and side effects

Consumption during pregnancy or in cases of epilepsy or hypersensitivity should be avoided.

Disclaimer

The information provided in this fact sheet is for educational purposes only and must not be taken or interpreted as a suggestion or as medical advise. If you have any medical conditions you should consult your health care professional.

T

Ingredient . Tea Tree oil

About Ingredient

Tea Tree Oil (also known as Melaleuca) is a natural antibacterial disinfectant that was commonly used as a general antiseptic by the aborigine tribes for thousands of years. More recently, the scientific community has confirmed that Tea Tree Oil has tremendous medicinal benefits. It is a light yellow oil that has a scent similar to nutmeg, and it is produced by steaming tea tree leaves and then squeezing the oil out.

History

The local Australian indigenous inhabitants told him about the healing powers of these trees. The leaves of this tea tree were used for many years by the indigenous peoples of Australia. The Australian aboriginal people used tea tree leaves to In 1770, captain James Cook of the British Royal Navy set down at Botany Bay landing near to the eventual site of present day Sydney. From there, he travelled north through the coastal regions of New South Wales.

In New South Wales he found masses of trees thick with sticky, aromatic leaves that by boiling rendered a spicy tea.

As the tea tree oil leaves fell into the waters of the surrounding lagoons Freshly crushed leaves were applied directly to an injury, and then held in place with a mud pack. The medicinal effects of this poultice were so powerful that it helped combat infection in the wound and also overcome the potential for further infection caused by the non-sterile mud pack.

Benefits

Tea Tree Oil has wonderful properties that makes it a popular natural agent for curing all three types of infectious organisms: fungus, bacteria, and virus. More importantly, it is known to effectively fight a number of infections that are resistant to some antibiotics. Therefore, Tea Tree Oil is an excellent natural remedy for hundreds of bacterial and fungal skin ailments such as acne, abscess, oily skin, blisters, sun burns, athlete's foot, warts, herpes, insect bites, rashes, dandruff and other minor wounds and irritations.

Studies have shown that Tea Tree Oil also treats respiratory problems ranging from common sore throats, coughs and runny nose to severe conditions such as asthma, tuberculosis, and bronchitis. The anti-viral properties of the oil fight many common infectious diseases such as chicken pox, shingles and measles, flu, cold sores and verrucae. It also strengthens the body's immune system, which is often weakened by stress, illness, or by the use of antibiotics and other drugs. It can also be used as a mouth wash, since it is highly effective in healing oral candidiasis (a fungal infection of mouth and throat.

Nutritional profile

Fortunately, Melaleuca alternifolia oil has over 100 components working synergistically together, most of which could not even be identified back in the early years, so an exact nature-identical copy was impossible to synthesize from man-made chemicals. In the Sixties, the oil made a remarkable comeback, the first scientific evidence in decades confirmed that it had a favorable effect in the treatment of boils, gynecological infections and later for varied foot problems and nail bed infections. Now the once sidelined oil was gaining in popularity, and farms were being set up to harvest the oil on a commercial basis.

Precautions and side effects

Pregnant and breast-feeding women should avoid the use of Tea Tree Oil.

Undiluted Tea Tree Oil can cause itchiness, irritation, and redness on sensitive skin. Therefore, if you have sensitive skin, it is always safer to dilute the oil in another base oil such as olive oil.

Disclaimer

The information provided in this fact sheet is for educational purposes only and must not be taken or interpreted as a suggestion or as medical advise. If you have any medical conditions you should consult your health care professional.

T

Ingredient . Thyme

About Ingredient

A delicate looking herb with a penetrating fragrance, thyme is a wonderful addition to bean, egg and vegetable dishes. Both fresh and dried thyme is available in your local supermarket throughout the year. Thyme leaves are curled, elliptically shaped and very small, measuring about one-eighth of an inch long and one-sixteenth of an inch wide. The upper leaf is green-grey in colour on top, while the underside is a whitish colour. Along with fresh sprigs of parsley and bay leaves, thyme is included in the French combination of herbs called bouquet garni used to season stock, stews and soups.

History

Thyme has been used since ancient times for its culinary, aromatic and medicinal properties. The ancient Egyptians used it as an embalming agent to preserve their deceased pharoahs. In ancient Greece, thyme was widely used for its aromatic qualities, being burned as incense in sacred temples. Thyme was also a symbol of courage and admiration with the phrase "the smell of thyme" being a saying that reflected praise unto its subject. Thyme's association with bravery continued throughout medieval times when it was a ritual for women to give their knights a scarf that had a sprig of thyme placed over an embroidered bee. Since the 16th century, thyme oil has been used for its antiseptic properties, both as mouthwash and a topical application.

Thyme is native to areas such as Asia, southern Europe and the Mediterranean region and is also cultivated in North America.

Benefits

Thyme has a long history of use in natural medicine in connection with chest and respiratory problems including coughs, bronchitis, and chest congestion. Only recently, however, have researchers pinpointed some of the components in thyme that bring about its healing effects. The volatile oil components of thyme are now known to include carvacolo, borneol, geraniol, but most importantly, thymol. Thyme also contains a variety of flavonoids, including apigenin, naringenin, luteolin, and thymonin. These flavonoids increase thyme's antioxidant capacity, and combined with its status as a very good source of manganese, give thyme a high standing on the list of anti-oxidant foods.

Nutritional profile

The range of other health-supportive nutrients found in thyme is also impressive. This food emerged from our food ranking system as an excellent source of iron and manganese, a very good source of calcium and a food source of dietary fibre.

Disclaimer

The information provided in this fact sheet is for educational purposes only and must not be taken or interpreted as a suggestion or as medical advise. If you have any medical conditions you should consult your health care professional.